Tag Archives: Halloween night

Fantastic Halloween Adventure: Costume Quest 2

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Last year, I wrote about the first Costume Quest game. A rare gem that perfectly encapsulates the experience of Halloween. This year, Costume Quest 2 has been released and looks to continue the amazing Halloween spirit.

Why it is a fantastic adventure: Differing from the first game, Costume Quest 2 takes place in various eras of time. Not only will you and your kids get to virtually trick or treat in a familiar neighborhood setting, but you’ll get to visit Ancient Egypt, the Louisiana Bayou, a future where Halloween is illegal, and more!
There are multiple costumes to try on, lots of creepy cards to collect, and tons and tons of candy to collect and spend.

It is a fun adventure for the entire family. So gather round the computer or TV and spend some quality family Halloween time together.

Costume Quest 2 is available on PC, PlayStation or Xbox.

Have you been to a pumpkin patch yet?

From last year’s 31 Days of Halloween, don’t miss out on the chance to take the family to your local pumpkin patch!
See Last year’s post to find a pumpkin patch near you!

A Peek at my Halloween Decorations

Hello, everyone! I hope you are enjoying October! Since my blog is ready for all things Halloween, I thought I’d take the time to share a few pictures of my Halloween decorations this year.

As always, don’t forget to check out my 31 Days of Halloween posts by clicking on the banner on the right hand column!

Thank You!

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Today is Halloween. That means it is October 31st and I just finished 31 days of Halloween posts! First off, I would like to say Thank You to everyone who came to read my posts every day. I hope you found it entertaining and helpful in making your Halloween this year memorable and fun!

With that said, please keep coming back! My blog does not disappear after Halloween! I have some great things coming up in the next year. I am finishing my middle grade novel, tentatively titled Eliza, the Witch. I am also hard at work on a second novel, Kyle McDuffy, Elementary School Investigator. Stay tuned to the blog for updates on those including sneak peeks at a few chapters here and there.

I will also be continuing my Fantastic Adventures in Family Entertainment series with reviews on family friendly tv shows movies, books, games and activities.

Again, thank you from the bottom of my heart! I enjoyed writing about my favorite day of the year and I hope you enjoyed reading it! Please keep returning to the blog and don’t forget to check out my books! If you’d like, leave a comment below or click the Like button if you enjoyed my blog this month.

Have a wonderful Halloween evening and I’ll be posting again very soon, although I think I’ll take the day off tomorrow!

Signing off for 31 Days of Halloween,

Ryan R. Palmer

The History of Halloween

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We all celebrate Halloween but how much do you really know about it? Here’s a little history lesson for Halloween!

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in).

The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1. This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth. In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the presence of the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids, or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities.

During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By A.D. 43, Romans had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain.

The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and the incorporation of this celebration into Samhain probably explains the tradition of “bobbing” for apples that is practiced today on Halloween.

By the 800s, the influence of Christianity had spread into Celtic lands. In the seventh century, Pope Boniface IV designated November 1 All Saints’ Day, a time to honor saints and martyrs. It is widely believed today that the pope was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related, but church-sanctioned holiday. The celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before it, the night of Samhain, began to be called All-hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween. Even later, in A.D. 1000, the church would make November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. Together, the three celebrations, the eve of All Saints’, All Saints’, and All Souls’, were called Hallowmas.

 

Interested in going deeper and learning more about Halloween? I strongly recommend this Book: Trick or Treat: A History of Halloween by Lisa Morton
http://www.amazon.com/Trick-Treat-A-History-Halloween/dp/1780230478

5 More Halloween Crafts

What’s more fun than making things with your kids?  We’ve all seen those craft websites and magazines with those amazingly good looking crafts that look oh so easy to make. Have you eve tried to make those? Yeah, they never turn out the way you though, right? Well, here are five crafts that are guaranteed to turn out great because they are simple in construction and explanation.

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Halloween jars. Just get some empty glass jars, clean them out well and paint away! It’s a great creative way to engage with your kids!

 

 

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Paper Bag Monsters. These are a fun and easy craft and a great creativity spark! Simply paint, cut out construction paper and then glue!

 

 

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Popsicle Sticks. Glue together a bunch of Popsicle sticks (on paper or a heavy string) and paint away!

 

 

 

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Seed Crafts! All you need is some construction paper, corn seeds, beans, rope and lotsa glue! Have fun with it. How many different things can you make?

 

 

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Fun with Paper Plates. These are also an easy, fun craft for kids. All you need are the cheapo paper plates, some construction paper, scissors and glue! Create any Halloween inspired monster you can think of! Frankenstein, Dracula, Jack-O’-Lanters, Mummies, etc!

Halloween Village Favorites

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I have always wanted a Halloween village. Sure, most people have Christmas villages with happy ice skaters and a cheery Santa frolicking in the snow but I’ve always wanted a village of dead trees, spooky creatures and haunted houses! I have yet to acquire any parts of my Halloween village, but one day I hope to have a sizable collection. I fin it is the perfect final addition to great indoor Halloween decor. Pictured below you will find pieces that inspire me and, I hope, inspire you too! Which ones do you like?  Happy Halloween!