Tag Archives: Batman

Father / Daughter Halloween Costume Ideas

Hello, dad! Are you taking your daughter trick or treating this year? Are you dressing up with her? Oh, it never crossed your mind eh? That’s okay, most dads don’t think of it.
Perhaps your wife has mentioned you should get a costume to take your daughter out trick or treating this year? Think harder. Yep. That one day four weeks ago while you were watching football and she mentioned something about maybe dressing up for Halloween with your daughter this year. Well, it’s happening, and I am here to save you!

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Morton Salt. What is cuter than your little girl dressing up as the Morton salt girl? You, dressed as the salt container! Your daughter (and wife) will love you for this.

 

 

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Batman and Batgirl.
 This one actually gets you to dress your daughter as a superhero! Plus, you get to be Batman! Everyone wins!

 

 


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Peter Pan and Tinker Bell. Your daughter will always want to be a princess for Halloween. Escort your little Tinker Bell with pride.

 

 

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King Arthur and his Court.
You get to dress up as a king, complete with armor. She gets to dress up as a maiden. Everyone wins (and you don’t look cute).

 

 

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Mike and Boo. Your daughter will love running around trying to be a scary monster. You get to be her protector.

 

 

 

 

 

What is a Superhero Without Children?

There is a problem here in America. Our children have no superheroes. Long gone are the days of campy comic books, boy scout Superman films and tongue in cheek camp from Adam West and Burt Ward. Today’s superhero has to be conflicted, strong and of our world.

It wasn’t too long ago that American society rejected the dark and conflicted superhero. Tim Burton’s “Batman Returns” was so abhorred by parents that Warner Bros., the toy companies and McDonalds all cried foul and insisted they did not know the film was going to be so “dark” and realistic. Yet, today, parents don’t think twice about taking a five year old to see the PG-13 “The Avengers” or “The Dark Knight Rises”, and those films are applauded for their darkness and realism.

“Superman”, starring Christopher Reeves was such a huge success because it made Superman accessible to all generations. The kids could look up to his boy scout image and be inspired to do good things for truth, justice and the American way. Parents could identify with the love story and the tale of the ultimate immigrant coming to America.

Something happened along the way to present day. The kids grew up. And with that, a desire to see their superheroes grow up, too. “The Avengers” and “The Dark Knight Rises” all had prominent display shelves at the toy stores for kids of all ages. A less-informed parent who sees the toys and remembers Batman from his Adam West or even Joel Schumacher days would assume that the movie is just that – kid stuff. Unfortunately, “The Dark Knight Rises” is nowhere near safe for kids, and “The Avengers” (for all the toys they have you would think it is a G Rated film) has copious amounts of violence and the cast is filled with characters who all take themselves way too seriously.
The now 20-somethings love this stuff. Their childhood superheroes are now hardcore and based in reality. It makes the experience so much more real. Any attempt at toning down a superhero movie for children is considered lame, not epic enough, or stupid kid stuff. Except, these fans are forgetting something. It is a crucial piece in the puzzle to the longevity of superheroes. Without a proper role model superhero like Christopher Reeves’ Superman, or a campy version of Batman every now and then, kids will not get to see superheroes on the big screen or the comics, and they will slowly fade from existence.

Now that the realistic and gritty superheroes have had their moment to shine, the children need someone to look up to in our current times. Let the children have their heroes back.

Fantastic Adventure #5: Batman: The Brave and the Bold

So, you took my advice and showed your kids Batman & Robin, and now they have a hankering for more? With Batman being so popular lately, it really does a disservice to kids when toy companies make The Dark Knight Rises action figures

and other toys, as that film is extremely graphic and nowhere near safe for child viewing.  But, of course, your kids will see the toys and then want to see Batman. If you took the first step and showed them Batman & Robin, great! If not, you can read about it on my blog and come back to this post, if you so desire. To continue with family friendly entertainment, my pick for today is Batman: The Brave and the Bold, a TV series on Cartoon Network.
Think of this cartoon series as an animated version of Adam West’s 1960’s Batman. It has all the corny humor, gags and overacting fight scenes that we all remember from the Adam West show. Each episode Batman teams up with a different hero from DC Comics and together they take out the different villains and stop their dastardly schemes.

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Why it is a fantastic adventure: Having Batman team up with a different hero each week is a good way to introduce your kids to comic books and all of the different heroes that are out there. Beyond that, it is a good way to show your kids the power of teamwork.
The entire series has a very fantastical feel to it. The heroes are big, strong, wise cracking purveyors of justice and the villains are over the top failures of massive schemes. The schemes are so ridiculous and out there that it really encourages kids to think outside the box and cerate lavish ideas of their own. Imagination is downplayed in our society. there is a time to play and a time to be “serious’. We teach our children that being imaginative is not serious. They have to study hard, do homework, learn Math and Science so they can get a job that makes good money. Don’t worry – you are not a bad parent. You are only passing on what your parents taught you. However, that may be another topic for another post.
Back to the show. With the over the top schemes (stealing a giant piano or trying to ruin Christmas), you won’t have to explain elaborate schemes to your kids.
The villains are always doing something simple and are defeated in mostly simple ways. They are brought to justice and all is well with the world. These are great base values for your

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children to learn, and you can use them as talking points about right versus wrong.
Teamwork, right versus wrong, imagination and justice are the main themes of the show and a great way to not only introduce your kids to comic book characters, but a great family friendly Batman cartoon.

Batman: The Brave and the Bold is on reruns on Cartoon Network. Also available to own or rent on DVD. Rated TV Y7.

Fantastic Adventure #1: Batman & Robin

clip_image002[5]To kick off my new series, Fantastic Adventures in Family Entertainment, I thought it would be appropriate to start with a superhero film. With the glutton of superhero films hitting theaters this summer it may be difficult to figure out which one is the most kid-friendly. Unfortunately, all of the summer superhero films this summer are rated PG-13, which means you may not want your young child seeing any of these films.

However, if your child is hankering for a superhero fix because he or she sees all of the toys in the store or in a McDonalds Happy Meal, I’ve got you covered.

Batman & Robin may live in movie history as a terrible joke, but the sole purpose of the film when it was created was to be as family friendly and “toyetic” as possible. The end result is a campy, fun adventure film that boys and girls can really enjoy.

Why it is a fantastic adventure: Batman exists in a fantasy world. Gotham City is full of hulking statues, and the sets and action sequences are born out of pure imagination. Imagination is the key word here. While modern day superhero movies tend to take place in our own world, the superhero films of the 1990s took a less serious approach. Kids can watch this film and let their imagination run wild. It encourages them to create their own worlds with their own sets of rules. If the Gotham Observatory is a building being held in the hands of a massive statue as a starting point for your child’s imagination, then where they go from there, well, the sky is the limit. This is why I am a huge fan of any film that uses its own created world. It encourages its audience to dream up new and bigger things. Who knows? Your kid may be the next big set designer, fashion designer, writer, etc.

There are a lot of visually superb sets and lighting in this film with bright colors and large establishing shots that will draw your child into the world of the film.  The action is mostly non-stop, as director Joel Schumacher wanted to take you on a ride throughout the film. There is a rocket blasting to space in which Batman and Robin must free themselves, skydiving superheroes, and lots of hand to hand fight scenes. The visual effects –especially Mr. Freeze’s freeze gun – are lavish and impressive.

 
Although the rating is PG-13, I find this film to be horribly mis-rated, considering that The Dark Knight is rated PG-13 and is very violent and nowhere near kid-friendly. There are a few romantic scenes with Poison Ivy, but these are mostly related to something your kids will just say “Ewwwwww” at: kissing.

The theme of this film is family. There are touching moments with Bruce, Dick and Barbara as Alfred recovers from a life threatening disease. In the end, the message is all about family and sticking together. If you have a little girl and worried if she will not like a “boy’s” movie, you can be safe with this film as Barbara Gordon and Batgirl are introduced.

All of the over the top action, visuals and sets will keep your kids –and you – entertained for the 2 hour run time.